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Gov. Kate Brown today Wednesday, April 1, issued an executive order placing a 90-day moratorium on commercial evictions for nonpayment, in light of the impacts on business owners caused by the COVID-19 crisis.

The order also strengthens Brown's previous ban on residential evictions, and prohibits landlords from charging tenants late fees for nonpayment of rent during the moratorium.

"During this unprecedented public health crisis, too many Oregonians have found themselves with no way to pay the monthly rent for their homes and businesses," Brown said. "These are difficult times. This order will help Oregon small businesses stay in their locations without the threat of eviction."

The previous executive order put a temporary moratorium on residential evictions for nonpayment in light of the public health emergency caused by the spread of coronavirus in Oregon. The order is effective for 90 days as of March 22.

“Through no fault of their own, many Oregonians have lost jobs, closed businesses, and found themselves without a source of income to pay rent and other housing costs during this coronavirus outbreak,” Brown said. “The last thing we need to do during this crisis is turn out more Oregonians struggling to make ends meet from their homes and onto the streets. This is both a moral and a public health imperative. Keeping people in their homes is the right thing for Oregon families, and for preventing the further spread of COVID-19.”

Under the Governor's emergency powers, the order places a temporary hold throughout Oregon on law enforcement actions relating to residential evictions for not paying rent.

Recognizing that landlords and property owners face their own costs if tenants are not able to pay rent, the governor and her Coronavirus Economic Advisory Council are engaging lenders to find potential solutions and are exploring various state and federal policy options that might be available to provide assistance to borrowers or other options for relief. Oregon Housing and Community Services and the Department of Consumer and Business Services are also pursuing relief options.

The order is part of the governor's coronavirus housing and homelessness strategy, which includes expanding shelter capacity with social distancing measures in place, identifying emergency COVID-19 shelter options for people experiencing homelessness who must be isolated or quarantined, exploring options for rent assistance, seeking expansion of federal eviction moratoriums, and homeowner foreclosure avoidance.

All coronavirus executive orders will be posted on the Oregon Coronavirus Information and Resources Page after they have been issued and signed.

The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services issued an emergency order on March 25, 2020. The order provides protection to people and businesses struggling because of the disruptions caused by the COVID-19 outbreak.

The order requires all insurance companies to postpone policy cancellations and nonrenewals, extend grace periods for premium payments, and extend deadlines for reporting claims.

The Division of Financial Regulation is sharing the frequently asked questions it has received to help insurers comply with the department’s order. The FAQs will be updated regularly.

Visit the Emergency order FAQ page to review answers to questions related to the order.

Visit the COVID-19 regulated businesses page to review the latest industry news and guidance issued by the division.

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